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How to use tools for Babysitters – PreschoolerSkip

When you hire new babysitter for your little one, you might ask her what’s in her babysitter’s tool kit. If she looks clueless, you might want to look elsewhere for a babysitter, or help her out by providing a list of items you want her to have. You could also put together a kit of important information and resources for your babysitters so they don’t have to root through your cabinets to find what they need.

Useful Skills

You shouldn’t have to train a babysitter in all the skills you hope he has. Knowing CPR is a must, along with minor first aid skills to handle the normal cuts and scrapes Seem to get during playtime. It’s also helpful if he can cook if you plan to be out a while and you don’t want to order pizza for the sitter and your child. The sitter should know enough about child development and behavior management to control your child without having to resort to punishment or tying your child to a chair in front of the television. Suggestions for a book, a game or other playtime activities your child enjoys should be sufficient to help the babysitter keep your child occupied while you’re out.

Necessary Information

Post information the sitter might need in a central location or hand her a pre-printed sheet she can refer to if needed. Include your cell phone numbers, where you will be, what time your child normally goes to bed, food allergies and other critical information. If you expect the babysitter to complete tasks, such as bathe and dress your child for bed or dispensing medication while you’re gone, leave instructions and show her where to find the items she needs. A container with the necessary items in one place can reduce the amount of time it takes her to complete the tasks.

Regular Routines

If you normally read your child a story, pray with her, get her favorite blanket out or perform other bedtime routines, explain them to the babysitter so he has an easier time of getting your child to bed on time, with the least amount of struggle. You could place the storybook, blanket, pajamas and other necessary items in the container with your contact information and instructions. You might also include information on the dodges your child often tries in an attempt to extend bedtime or in her attempts to eat foods she shouldn’t eat. Information about your child’s scams ensures that your child understands that the rules still apply when you’re out for the evening. You also want to show the sitter where to find clean clothes, disposable underwear your child wears and your first-aid supplies.


If you will be out past your little one’s bedtime, the sitter needs to know which behaviors you find acceptable for her to indulge in when your little one is asleep. You could point out a convenient location for her to study in and information on how to connect her tablet or laptop to your Internet source, if she needs it. List snacks you allow her to eat and snacks she can give your child. It shouldn’t be necessary, but you probably want to say that you want her to refrain from chatting with friends or having anyone over while you’re gone.